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Best Folk Albums of 2017 - Uproxx

14. It’s hard not to compare Molly Burch to Patsy Cline when you hear her deep drawl. But the ’60s-throwback waltzing sound of her debut record Please Be Mine extends far beyond nostalgia for that era, or the country genre itself. There are too many small, experimental details on this album to pigeonhole it in any one genre, but given the generous palette of folk, it felt like the most natural fit here, where her sometimes confrontational kiss-offs to bad men, and admission of her own mistakes, depict a songwriter who is able to convey emotional pain with a sweet, unassuming grace. Albums focused too much on yearning for love can get heavy, but Burch keeps it light, never giving an inch even when her desires don’t pan out.–C.W.

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The 20 Best New Artists of 2017 - Paste Magazine

8. Molly Burch
Los Angeles-born, Austin-based Molly Burch is a force to be reckoned with, albeit a subtle one. Her debut LP, Please Be Mine, was released in February and was not just one of the year’s best albums by a newcomer, but one of the best period. (It ranked No. 42 on our 50 Best Albums of 2017.) The record is heartfelt, intricate and unconditionally romantic. As a trained jazz singer, Burch’s vintage vocal anchor the 10 songs, particularly on the standout “Fool” and the title track, “Please Be Mine.” With dual talents for Laurel Canyon folk and Hit Parade pop of the ‘60s, she’s a breath of fresh air in comparison to much of today’s overly processed singer-songwriters. This year she opened for everyone from Lucy Dacus to Grizzly Bear, so keep her name (and her album) in your brain. —Annie Black

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The 50 Best Albums of 2017 - Paste Magazine

42. The Austin-based Molly Burch is a force to be reckoned with, albeit a subtle one. Her debut LP, Please Be Mine, was released in February and is not only one of the year’s best albums by a newcomer, but one of the best period. The record is heartfelt, intricate and unconditionally romantic. As a trained jazz singer, Burch’s vintage vocal stylings truly shine throughout the ten songs, particularly on the standout “Fool” and the title track, “Please Be Mine.” Burch’s songwriting and voice is wholly complemented by guitarist Dailey Toliver’s delicate instrumentation, creating a thoroughly-nuanced album perfect for these telling times when all we really need is a bit of love. —Annie Black

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